colic

Diagnoses, clinical pathology findings, and treatment outcome of geriatric horses: 345 cases (2006-2010).

Diagnoses, clinical pathology findings, and treatment outcome of geriatric horses: 345 cases (2006-2010).

J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2013 Dec 15;243(12):1762-8

Authors: Silva AG, Furr MO

Abstract
Objective-To compare clinical, clinical pathology, and outcome variables between geriatric and nongeriatric horses. Design-Retrospective case-control study. Animals-690 horses (345 horses ≥ 20 years old and 345 horses > 1 and < 20 years old) examined at a referral hospital. Procedures-Medical records were examined, and data collected included horse description, diagnosis, outcome, and CBC and serum biochemical analysis results. Cases were horses ≥ 20 years old, and controls were horses > 1 and < 20 years old. Results-Mean ± SD age was 23.9 ± 4.6 years for cases and 9.2 ± 3.6 years for controls. Arabian and pony breeds were significantly overrepresented in the geriatric group, compared with the control group. Diagnoses related to the digestive system, musculoskeletal system, and respiratory system were most common in this hospital population overall (cases and controls). Colic was the most common health problem overall. Digestive system disorders were significantly more prevalent among cases. Short-term survival rates for most categories of colic were no different for cases than for controls, with the exception of the category idiopathic colic. Considering all conditions, cases were significantly more likely to be nonsurvivors than were controls. Minor differences in serum biochemical results were found in some disease subcategories. Geriatric horses with colic were not more commonly euthanized than were adult nongeriatric horses. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results indicated that in this population of horses in a referral hospital, age was associated with the prevalence of specific disease conditions. Few differences between cases and controls were found in serum biochemical values. PMID: 24299549 [PubMed - in process]

Share

Acorns and Oak Leaves

Oak LeavesDoes your horse treat acorns and oak leaves like a delicacy? Acorns and oak leaves contain tannin which in large quantities can be poisonous to your horse. Red or black oak varieties contain the most tannin; white oak varieties contain the least. The concentration of tannin in early spring leaves and green acorns is much higher than in mature leaves or ripe acorns.The most common problem we see in horses eating acorns is mild colic from indigestion. Horses with any predisposition to founder should not be allowed access to acorns as they are high in carbohydrates and can induce laminitis. Severe cases of acorn poisoning are extremely rare. The signs of acorn poisoning can be loss of appetite, excessive salivation, blood in the urine or manure, colic like pain, slow or irregular heart-rate, elevated temperature, pale mucous membranes, watery eyes and depressed attitude. In extreme cases liver and kidney failure ensues and other organs begin to hemorrhage. If you feel your horse is showing any of the above signs and has access to acorns remove them from the area and contact us.

Share