Entries by steven

2013 FEI Equine Prohibited Substances List in effect from 1 January

LAUSANNE, (FEI) – The FEI Equine Prohibited Substance List for 2013, which has now been approved by the FEI Bureau, will come into force on 1 January 2013.

Following a period of consultation with the National Federations, the FEI List Group held its most recent meeting during the London 2012 Paralympics and signed off changes to the List for 2013. The changes include the addition of five new substances and other amendments.

The changes, which will be included in the 2013 List and will come into effect on 1 January of next year, are summarised here and below:

  • Five new substances have been added to the List for 2013. These are the Controlled Medication substances Cyclosporin, a systemic immunosuppressant; Tropicamide, which affects the central nervous system and has a potential for abuse; Pitcher Plant preparation (Sarapin), which is reputed to have analgesic properties, a potential to affect performance and its use is considered to be a welfare concern; Delmadinone acetate and Chlormadinone acetate, synthetic steroidal progestins that decrease testosterone concentration and have the potential to affect performance;
  • Fentanyl and Morphine (analgesics), both of which are currently classified as Banned Substances, will be moved to the Controlled Medication section of the List in 2013 due to their increasingly common legitimate use in equine medicine;
  • Suxibuzone, which converts to Phenylbutazone in the body and is currently listed as Phenylbutazone, will be listed separately under Controlled Medications;
  • Deslorelin, which was categorised as a Controlled Medication substance in the 2012 List, will be removed from the 2013 List.

“The FEI List Group seeks to use the most up-to-date scientific research and information as part of its ongoing review of the Prohibited Substances List,” said Graeme Cooke, FEI Veterinary Director.

“The National Federations and all the Veterinarians involved in our sport are very much a part of the consultation process and all comments received on the initial suggested changes, which were first proposed in April of this year, were discussed by the List Group prior to the changes being finalised.

“Publishing the changes to the List 90 days in advance, in accordance with our rules, means that the National Federations and their athletes will have plenty of time to familiarise themselves with the changes well ahead of the 2013 Equine Prohibited Substances List coming into force on 1 January next year.”

The 2013 Equine Prohibited Substance List will be accessible prior to 1 January 2013 on the FEI Clean Sport website. Additionally, information is now available on the searchable FEI Equine Prohibited Substances Database, which is free to download for Smartphones.

Rabies Still a Menace

COLLEGE STATION, (TAMU) – World Rabies Day is September 28, 2012.It is a day to raise awareness about the impact of human and animal rabies. More than 55,000 people die from rabies worldwide every year, a rate of one person every 10 minutes. This is an astonishing number, especially because rabies in humans in 100 per cent preventable. Most of these cases are transmitted to humans by dogs.

World Rabies Day events have been held in 150 countries, and have vaccinated 7.7 million dogs to date. World Rabies Day was created in 2006 by the Global Alliance for Rabies Control. The Alliance consisted of researchers and professionals involved with human and animal healthcare, including Dr. Leon Russell, professor in the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM).

Russell explained that the goal of World Rabies Day is to reduce the amount of rabies cases throughout the world by ensuring adequate animal vaccination and control, educating people who may be at risk, and increasing access to appropriate medical care for those bitten by rabies infected animals.  For more information about getting animals vaccinated on World Rabies Day in your area, please contact your local veterinarian.

While there are various strains of rabies, dogs are the primary source for transmission to humans across the globe. However, canine rabies virus strain has been eradicated in the United States because of proper and complete vaccination procedures.

“Our hope is to eliminate canine rabies across the globe,” Russell said. “Rabies is completely preventable. We want people to understand the importance of vaccinating against the disease. But while canine rabies has been eliminated, there are still treats to humans and pets in the United States, so people, particularly pet owners need to take precautions.”

Dogs and cats contract rabies primarily from skunks, raccoons, and bats in the United States. These canine and feline pets serve as “bridge animals” or carriers of rabies between wildlife hosts and people. Russell explained that if you suspect your dog or cat has been exposed to a rabid animal, you should take your pet to a veterinarian immediately.

While Russell says that it is good to be aware of potentially rabid bats, skunks, and raccoons, nothing is as effective in preventing rabies as vaccination of your canine and feline pets.

“There are two types of vaccines. One protects pets for one year, the other for three years,” Russell said. “They are both great vaccines, and sometimes local ordinances or price dictates which one pet owners choose – but regardless, pets should always be routinely vaccinated against rabies.”

In addition to dogs and cats, Russell recommends vaccinating cattle and equines as well. While dogs and cats predominantly contract rabies from various wildlife species (skunks, raccoons, bats), horses and cattle most often contract rabies from skunks.

“Horses that are stalled, particularly at night, should be vaccinated,” Russell said. “We’ve seen cases of horses that contract rabies from a skunk that gets into the stall; it isn’t common, but it does happen. It’s better to be safe than sorry when it comes to rabies. Vaccinating your animals is the best prevention.”